Ask Me is linked with Any Body and relates with Walther Von Stolzing

Weird subject, isn’t it? Quite obvious for everybody, the persons ‘Ask Me’ and ‘Any Body’ are artificial names. They will never belong to a real person. How they relate to ‘Walter von Stolzing’ will follow.

For over 25 years Human Inference has collected reference data, for instance on persons. Because of our reference set we immediately recognize that ‘Ask Me’ and ‘Any Body’ are fake names. People are using these either in test situations or to hide their actual names.

In the old days we only needed to test on ‘Test Test’, in more recent years we see great inventiveness on these fake names. A brief example can be seen in the following list.

Alpha Beta Any Body
Ask Me Best Friend
Blue Sky Cool Dude
Dress Code El Comandante
Guess Who In Cognito

In case you cannot rely on reference data and interpretation you need to provide a check list. Providing it is one thing, but since users tend to be really creative, maintaining it is essential. Continue reading ‘Ask Me is linked with Any Body and relates with Walther Von Stolzing’

Has your name ever hurt you? – when nomen becomes omen

Addressing clients with the right data often means the difference between making a profit and not making a profit. Working with data quality experts has made me ever more consious of the value personal data represents for people. In this respect names are especially intriguing to me, as owners appear to identify with their name a lot. So I decided to do a little research and determine if people really are what their name tells you. Can nomen indeed become omen?

Your parents probably gave a lot of thought to the name they once gave you, and as it turns out they were right to do so! Research tells us a name can do wonders for its owner, as well as a lot of damage for that matter. Let’s have a look at some remarkable results.

Peter for President!
Recent studies show that in the US a student called Fred is more likely to fail his exam than a student who just happened to be named Andrew: people tend to indentify with their name and, in general, have a positive feeling about letters that correspond with their initials. Consequently Fred is far more likely to settle for a meager F, while Andrew will have an extra motive to strive for an A. Continue reading ‘Has your name ever hurt you? – when nomen becomes omen’

Any close encounters with the FBI terrorist watchlist?

tsc080105aJust before this summer the U.S. Department of Justice filed a report about the FBI Terrorist Watchlist. This watchtlist serves as a critical tool for screening and law enforcement personnel for alerting them when they come across a known or suspected terrorist. It is used by personnel at airports, harbours and the borderline. Also when you apply for a visum you are matched against this watchlist. The Terrorist Screening Center, a subsidiary of the FBI, is responsible for maintaining the watchlist.

This watchlist was created in 2004 from several other lists and at that time it consisted of about 68.000 entries. I use the word entries, because in the years after it became fuzzy if one record is the same as one individual. By the end of 2008 the list had grown to over 1,1 million entries. In 2008 after the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) mentioned that the list had passed the 1 million, the government came with an explanation. Although we have recorded over 1 million entries in the database, the net result is that these records correspond to about 400.000 individuals. Terrorist often use different and thus multiple identities, use several (falsified) passports etc. But adding entries with only the first initials and last name, while an entry of the full first names and last name already exists will result in unwanted side-effects. Continue reading ‘Any close encounters with the FBI terrorist watchlist?’

I am not Eddy!

Do you feel like I do? Everytime I register for a site, like this blogging area, I have to enter my name. First of all, this is annoying. Why can’t I keep track of a single set of data, somewhere in the big internet cloud, and just point to it? No, impossible! We apparently need to create multiple alter egos in the cloud to survive in the digital jungle. And once you decided to create again a new alter ego, you get these questions again: username? Password?

As a username, Eddy seems a logical choice… No, already exists. Now I am forced to think of something else. Eddy Reimerink maybe? No, spaces not allowed, neither are capitals. Let’s try eddyreimerink. Phew! Done. Again, created a new alter ego, a username that is a non-existing name and different from all the other user names I use. How do I manage this data quality problem?