Chinglish – the most delightful side-effect of internationalization

little grass has life

An increasing number of companies have to deal with data from the world’s fastest emerging economy: China. And the big question in this issue is of course: How can we compare these “strange” Chinese characters with our own writing set?

Grammar and character set of our Western alphabet-languages (such as English, French, Dutch or German) differ tremendously from Mandarin Chinese (which is the language spoken by most in the People’s Republic of China and abroad. Mandarin is a tonal language with an ideographic character set. Almost all characters have a semantic and a phonetic component. The different pithch in the pronunciation eventually determines the signification

Complicated? Definitely. But what about the other way around? Have you ever thought about the difficulties the Chinese have to face when trying to convert their language into meaningful English?

This phenomenon is sometimes hilariously being illustrated by the many public signs in China used to inform foreign visitors or to help them finding their way around.

This is truly a delightful side-effect of internationalization. …. Continue reading ‘Chinglish – the most delightful side-effect of internationalization’